MeCCSA20

Interesting few days at MeCCSA, this year being held in Brighton. Off-season seaside towns are an acquired taste but I like the vibe – foam-flecked sea and quiet contemplation.

I’m the Publisher at Rowman and Littlefield and head up the London team, myself commissioning into cultural studies and media and comms. Our media programme is important to us and we are investing in it. Lots of presentations were dealing with the problems of modern life – which is good to see. There was intelligent work presented on AI, smart tech and social media, as well as the structures and ownership of media as it stands in 2020. I think it’s fairly clear the modern media has completely failed to serve the left in any fair way and that the left, to have any chance of survival and eventually returning to power, need to invest heavily in changing the media environment.

I attended Professor Sarah Kember’s interesting keynote, which covered a lot of ground but spent a good while talking about open access. Her description of OA as accelerationist and tied to tenets of neoliberalism made sense. I personally think that it’s more libertarian than idealistic. Information doesn’t necessarily want anything, least of all to be free. (Who decides, who defines free?) In the backdrop, a commercial deal that was actually announced the next day – F1000, the OA research platform, purchased by Taylor and Francis. This is very bad news for OA. It also speaks to Sarah Kember’s point that OA is exhibiting signs that it will function just like other tech developments and enforce more and more of a platform hegemony, and replace a direct many to many relationship (academics to publishers to readers) with one where three or four OA platforms are in the middle. They will make a lot of money for a very few people – which is what tech has really been about. I left with much to follow up on, and read.

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